The free bass music downloads blog for DJs and music lovers.
Est. 2010, LSM is the emergency room for broken beats and ill basslines. Our Audiology unit specialize in electro-funk therapy, wonky bangers and wobbly-knees. Our ward only features the sickest free mixes, mash-ups and mishaps.

Articles

Published on January 23rd, 2018 | by Tariq Ziyad

0

Morpei Interview

Here at LSM, we got to catch up with Bolivian House/Techno Dj/Producer, Morpei for an interview. Read on and check out Morpei’s new release on Trouve Grooves, our review can be found here

Buy Morpei ‘Take’ on Beatport

Tell us a bit about yourself

My name is Agustin Morales Peinado but I go by the artist name of Morpei (MORales PEInado haha!). I am from a very small country in South America called Bolivia but I currently reside in USA. Being an artist in Bolivia is extremely difficult, if not, impossible. If you want to make a living from art, you have to become a teacher, or get a second job, there are no opportunites to “make it” there. That’s why I moved to the United States with the hopes to move to Europe sometime soon. I am a House Music and Techno producer and I am just doing this for the cuddles!

Was there a moment or a tune or a DJ set that made you decide you were going to produce and was it always going to be.

Yes, mostly local DJ’s from my country that I use to listen in parties when I was young. You might’ve not heard of them, but DJ’s like Mezpac, Marco Velkeo, Octavio Souza, Jean Bacarreza, Alexis Chaquer and some others helped me shape my taste in music and develop my sound.

Which events from over the years in your illustrious career really stick in your mind and why?

All of them. From the beginnings when I use to play for 15 people at small venues in my country, to international festivals in the United States and tours around several countries. If I see people dancing, no matter if they are 15 or 5000, it is a memorable night.

Who were your major influences in terms of music production?

I consider everything that I ever heard an influence. Everything I liked and disliked shaped my production.

What made you choose dance music as a genre?

I love making people dance while they forget about all their problems. That’s why I do what I do.

If you could work on a track with anyone from now or way back when, who would it be?

David Bowie

Tell us about any other music related stuff you’re involved in

I organize parties in the U.S. and South America, manage South American tours for other artists and produce other genres for other artists.

Tell us a few of your all time and current fave producers?

Haven’t heard a song from Hot Since 82 that I don’t love.

Are there any unfulfilled goals or aspirations of yours musically?

There are so many that I wouldn’t even be able to fit them in this interview. What matters is that I am determined and I have plenty of time to make everything in my list happen!

Could you offer a bit of advice for a up and coming producer?

As with anything in life, getting really good at something is going to take, sacrifice, time, reading, passion, practice and FAIL! Never get discouraged by a personal production that doesn’t sound good, always look at it as a learning point, move on to the next song and learn from your mistakes! I truly believe that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to become a master at something, so you better start working!

Where have you DJ’ed?

I think the highlights would be:

Middlelands Music Festival (Houston Texas), which was a collaboration between the guys at Insomniac and Lollapalooza.

Delirium, 6000 people at Santa Barbara’s Basketball stadium in California.

Ibiza Open in Bolivia.

And I have shared stage with names such as Umek, Robert Dietz, Steve Aoki, Tchami, Oliver Heldens and many more.

Whos supporting you on the DJ circuit?

In my years my music has gotten the support from the likes of Chus & Ceballos, Luciano, Supernova, Sonny Fodera, Doorly, Low Steppa, Miguel Campbell, Son of 8, Golf Clap and many more.

Describe to us your approach to a DJ set, do you like to gently warm up the crowd or go for the bangers or more of a journey approach?

I like starting groovy and sexy keep moving up from that. I don’t like doing my set like a wave, I like to keep it as straight line going up!

Of all the tunes you’ve made, which is your favorite?

As a producer you keep progressing and making better music. In my case I always end up disliking old tracks because with time I always notice the mistakes I made! But as I said before, I learn from those mistakes to make the next song better.

How did you link up with Trouve Grooves the founder of the label of the same name?

I like to say it is destiny!

What is it like DJ’ing in different countries?

It is one of the best parts of this job! Travelling, exploring, meeting new friends that become your family, eating new foods, and experimenting with new crowds is priceless. Best part is to get paid for doing this!

Which tunes are essentials in your DJ sets right now?

You’ll have to pull your Shazam out next time you catch me in your city!

What are the vital elements to making a tune that come into play when you’re in the studio?

I always close my eyes, and picture the track on the dance floor.

Tags: ,


About the Author



Tell us what you think!

Back to Top ↑
  • lifesupportmachine.dizzyjam.com
    juicebox.org.uk